two more birth quotations

“The erotic charge that […] lit up the performance of giving birth also seemed to light up the stories they told about it. Many of the stories I heard were not specifically sexual but, in the telling, were filled to overflowing with the kind of intimacy, excitement, pleasure, and passion that articulated itself in and through the birthing body they hailed—a body that, in being given, gave, that exceeded its limits in joy and strength, that managed, like Demeter retrieving Persephone from hell, ‘to go and get the baby on another planet / and bring the baby back.’”
–Della Pollack, Telling Bodies, Performing Birth

“Birth is nothing at all like pushing an orange out of a nostril. Nostrils weren’t created to do anything of the kind. […] A vagina is able to accommodate the size and shape of what it contains, whether we are talking about a penis or a baby.”
–Ina May Gaskin, Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth

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  • By October link round-up on 7 November 2012 at 11:15 AM

    [...] I share a lot of great links and pictures on Facebook and Twitter.  Here’s some of the best from October: “The erotic charge that […] lit up the performance of giving birth also seemed to light up the stories they told about it. Many of the stories I heard were not specifically sexual but, in the telling, were filled to overflowing with the kind of intimacy, excitement, pleasure, and passion that articulated itself in and through the birthing body they hailed—a body that, in being given, gave, that exceeded its limits in joy and strength, that managed, like Demeter retrieving Persephone from hell, ‘to go and get the baby on another planet / and bring the baby back.’” –Della Pollack, Telling Bodies, Performing Birth (via First The Egg) [...]

  • By Wednesday wisdom: Storytelling on 6 March 2013 at 2:31 PM

    [...] “The erotic charge that […] lit up the performance of giving birth also seemed to light up the stories they told about it. Many of the stories I heard were not specifically sexual but, in the telling, were filled to overflowing with the kind of intimacy, excitement, pleasure, and passion that articulated itself in and through the birthing body they hailed—a body that, in being given, gave, that exceeded its limits in joy and strength, that managed, like Demeter retrieving Persephone from hell, ‘to go and get the baby on another planet / and bring the baby back.’” –Della Pollack, Telling Bodies, Performing Birth (via First The Egg) [...]

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